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Oculus Rift is $599USD; Internet is outraged.
#1
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I want to see how the HTC Vive does to compare in price, but this seems like bad news for Facebookulus.



İmage
 
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#2
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Personally I'm not annoyed by the price, I'm annoyed with how Oculus handled the expectations regarding the price. Only 3-4 months ago Palmer came out and said that CV1 will be "in the ballpark" of the DK2 price (which was $350 USD). I've been putting money aside so that I will have enough for a Rift assuming they cost around that much. Now that they announce that the CV1 will cost nearly double what was implied a few months ago, I can't buy a Rift straight away. If they had hinted at the price being a lot higher than the DK2 a few months ago then I might have saved more.

I get that bleeding edge technology using high-end components is not going to be cheap, I get that this is not a piece of hardware aimed at the mainstream consumer. I just wish we had some warning beforehand.

I won't even get into the argument that bundling an Xbox controller raises the price because I don't think it would have increased it that much. I also think that was probably forced by whatever issues they have with the Touch that prevented them from launching it simultaneously. They needed an input 'solution' which developers could target, having a split user base between K+M and controller wouldn't have been a good idea. At least this way developers know that every Rift owner will own an Xbox One controller.

Definitely looking forward to Valve/HTC announce now, on the face of it the Vive should be more expensive given that it is supposed to be better specs and include the lighthouse / motion controllers. But this summary has been floating around:

Quote:Rift: 300 custom parts, all requiring molds, tooling, materials, created by external companies and assembled on a single line. Absurdly expensive packaging, matte black heavy box with custom molded casing. High Quality IR camera, look up how much it costs to manufacture a GoPro. Tack on an xbox controller (probably not much but it adds) and this little guy again not much but its something. Comes from silicon valley. Results in a cost higher than you're expecting.

Vive: Manufactured with cheaper parts, cheaper materials, manufacturing lines that are owned by the company making it in freaking Taiwan. The lighthouses are just two motors, two lasers, LED board, single photodiode, power cable... they cost almost nothing to make. Controllers are a bit expensive but since they're ambidextrous they only need one set of molds. They don't need to subsidize development costs since that has already been handled for them. They don't need to subsidize software since thats already been done for them. All they have to do is what valve says and what their industrial designers say.


Wow, long post

 
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#3
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Posting some answers from Palmer in his Reddit AMA.

Question:
My question is "why was the messaging about price so poor? $599 is not in the ballpark of $350 when your target audience is the mainstream".

Answer:
I handled the messaging poorly. Earlier last year, we started officially messaging that the Rift+Recommended spec PC would cost roughly $1500. That was around the time we committed to the path of prioritizing quality over cost, trying to make the best VR headset possible with current technology. Many outlets picked the story up as “Rift will cost $1500!”, which was honestly a good thing - the vast majority of consumers (and even gamers!) don’t have a PC anywhere close to the rec. spec, and many people were confused enough to think the Rift was a standalone device. For that vast majority of people, $1500 is the all-in cost of owning Rift. The biggest portion of their cost is the PC, not the Rift itself.

For gamers that already have high end GPUs, the equation is obviously different. In a September interview, during the Oculus Connect developer conference, I made the infamous “roughly in that $350 ballpark, but it will cost more than that” quote. As an explanation, not an excuse: during that time, many outlets were repeating the “Rift is $1500!” line, and I was frustrated by how many people thought that was the price of the headset itself. My answer was ill-prepared, and mentally, I was contrasting $349 with $1500, not our internal estimate that hovered close to $599 - that is why I said it was in roughly the same ballpark. Later on, I tried to get across that the Rift would cost more than many expected, in the past two weeks particularly. There are a lot of reasons we did not do a better job of prepping people who already have high end GPUs, legal, financial, competitive, and otherwise, but to be perfectly honest, our biggest failing was assuming we had been clear enough about setting expectations.

Another problem is that people looked at the much less advanced technology in DK2 for $350 and assumed the consumer Rift would cost a similar amount, an assumption that myself (and Oculus) did not do a good job of fixing. I apologize.

To be perfectly clear, we don’t make money on the Rift. The Xbox controller costs us almost nothing to bundle, and people can easily resell it for profit. A lot of people wish we would sell a bundle without “useless extras” like high-end audio, a carrying case, the bundled games, etc, but those just don’t significantly impact the cost. The core technology in the Rift is the main driver - two built-for-VR OLED displays with very high refresh rate and pixel density, a very precise tracking system, mechanical adjustment systems that must be lightweight, durable, and precise, and cutting-edge optics that are more complex to manufacture than many high end DSLR lenses. It is expensive, but for the $599 you spend, you get a lot more than spending $599 on pretty much any other consumer electronics devices - phones that cost $599 cost a fraction of that to make, same with mid-range TVs that cost $599. There are a lot of mainstream devices in that price-range, so as you have said, our failing was in communication, not just price.



Question:
How many games can we expect to have available to us by years end?

Answer:
At least 100 - Over 20 Oculus Studios titles, many more 3rd party titles.



Question:
I want to know more about the small new remote, can we play games with it? What was the decision behind it and what functionality can we expect from it

Answer:
We designed the Oculus Remote to be simple and intuitive input device for navigating VR experiences, especially when a fully-featured gamepad doesn’t make sense. An example is Oculus Video on Gear VR, which can be explored with just with gaze and tap. The remote is also ideal for non-gamers who want to try VR but aren’t familiar with a gamepad. It is also a good fit for apps that are ported across from Gear VR to Rift.



Question:
Will only apps downloaded from the Oculus store work or will we be able to use software that is downloaded outside the app store?

Answer:
You’ll be able to do both. You can download Rift titles from our store or elsewhere and run them.



Question:
Recommended specs are 970/290.. anyone buying a RIFT will EXPECT to play all games at max settings and have the best experience possible.. is a 970 up for that challenge? will Nvidias Pascal GPU's be better suited for VR? what will YOU (@palmer) be running on your rift set up?

Answer:
You won’t necessarily be able to play all games at MAX settings on the recommended spec. You will be able to play everything in the Oculus store at a high quality level (90 FPS) on the recommended spec. Personally, I am going to be running the standard rec spec rig to make sure I get the same experience as most users.



In regards to a long question regarding the international prices and high price in general:

Answer:
Check my other post, it covers most of this. I share your concerns - believe me, I want nothing more than for VR to succeed in the long run. Weak currencies in certain countries is especially a bummer, since we can't control it.

The unfortunate reality we discovered is that making a VR product good enough to deliver presence and eliminate discomfort was not really feasible at the lower prices of earlier dev kits that used mostly off the shelf hardware.

 
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#4
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Justified answers about the price or not, $600USD which is gonna easily be $1000+ NZD is waaay above the average persons threshold. Only hardcore first adopters will probably pick it up.

Sony and HTC, waiting on you. Please don't be ridiculously priced.

İmage
 
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#5
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(07-01-2016, 03:24 PM)AdminGG Wrote: Justified answers about the price or not, $600USD which is gonna easily be $1000+ NZD is waaay above the average persons threshold. Only hardcore first adopters will probably pick it up.

Sony and HTC, waiting on you. Please don't be ridiculously priced.

Gonna go ahead and guess $400 for Playstation VR ($500 with move controllers) and $750 for the HTC Vive. All USD prices, pretty much complete guesses in both cases based on my limited knowledge. Mainly chucking them here so I have something to come back to and laugh about in a month or two.

 
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#6
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(07-01-2016, 03:36 PM)Pythagean Wrote:
(07-01-2016, 03:24 PM)AdminGG Wrote: Justified answers about the price or not, $600USD which is gonna easily be $1000+ NZD is waaay above the average persons threshold. Only hardcore first adopters will probably pick it up.

Sony and HTC, waiting on you. Please don't be ridiculously priced.

Gonna go ahead and guess $400 for Playstation VR ($500 with move controllers) and $750 for the HTC Vive. All USD prices, pretty much complete guesses in both cases based on my limited knowledge. Mainly chucking them here so I have something to come back to and laugh about in a month or two.

All rumours are that PS VR will be the same price as console at launch, so 700$ ish here.

We'll see....

İmage
 
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#7
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(07-01-2016, 03:02 PM)Pythagean Wrote: Question:
How many games can we expect to have available to us by years end?

Answer:
At least 100 - Over 20 Oculus Studios titles, many more 3rd party titles.

That doesn't seem an honest estimate. With such a prohibitive price, so few Roft owners, there's little incentive for 3rd party game designers to be Rift compatible?

Or would it not be too much work to make a game Rift compatible?
 
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#8
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(08-01-2016, 09:49 AM)fresher taco Wrote:
(07-01-2016, 03:02 PM)Pythagean Wrote: Question:
How many games can we expect to have available to us by years end?

Answer:
At least 100 - Over 20 Oculus Studios titles, many more 3rd party titles.

That doesn't seem an honest estimate. With such a prohibitive price, so few Roft owners, there's little incentive for 3rd party game designers to be Rift compatible?

Or would it not be too much work to make a game Rift compatible?

Oculus have been helping to fund development from a lot of third part indie developers over the last couple of years.

Also not many developers would have known the price before yesterday, VR will still be big, it will just take longer that expected given the high barrier to entry

 
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#9
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Sony's PlayStation VR Stands To Be Almost 3x More Popular Than Oculus Rift In 2016
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangel...t-in-2016/

CES 2016: Sony says PlayStation VR will have over 100 titles
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-35249215

Come on Sony, don't put your dick in your butt and make this awesome. Undercut Oculus and make it real.


Any one seen this shit?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangel...ile-phone/

For real? Every year if you wanna keep up you gotta buy another Oculus?

İmage
 
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#10
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(08-01-2016, 03:27 PM)AdminGG Wrote: Any one seen this shit?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangel...ile-phone/

For real? Every year if you wanna keep up you gotta buy another Oculus?

Not at all, that quote is taken out of context. When Palmer was asked if the life-cycle would be like a console (5-6 years) or a mobile phone (1 year) he stated that it would be closer to the mobile platform. Meaning that it's probably every 2-3 years.

And would you expect anything different? VR is an extremely new technology and medium, there is bound to be an insanely quick development cycle with all of these devices as everyone figures out what works and what doesn't. Just look at how far the medium has come in the last 1-2 years, and now there will be actual money coming into these companies from VR which will only give them more resources to advance their respective HMDs

 
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