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The The Da Vinci Code Code
#1
The Da Vinci Code is the highest selling English language novel written in the last 50 years, if you exclude Harry Potter And The Philosophers Stone. What makes The Da Vinci Code such a great sale? Accessibility? Controversy? Fast paced action? The dreamy heartthrob protagonists Robert Langdon and Sophie Neveu?
It’s probably mostly the controversial conspiracy theory of the book that really got it so much attention, and as much as people like to slam it, there are a bunch of cool riddles and twists, and the pace of the book makes it a pretty great read.

So, I decided to try decipher the format of the book, and write my own detective thriller story.
That’s right, I’m going to crack the The Da Vinci Code code.
(Everything I have done is mired in caveats, premature rounding and general sloppiness, brace yourself)

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I decided not to included flashback scenes in any of the stats I collected because they were annoying. This is why Saunière only has one appearance (the prologue).

I counted 18 real characters in the book. There are maybe 2 named characters who are not included on this list because they only had one appearance and were not significant in the plot. There were also various (mostly police and catholic clergy) unnamed characters who aren’t worth mentioning either.
For each character, I figured out how many chapters they appeared in and which character archetype best described the character based on this website.
Although Robert Langdon was a mentor to Sophie Neveu, and Sophie was a hero in her own right, I just chose one primary archetype per character to keep it simple.
I also counted 18 “scenes”, one being “travelling somewhere” and another being “other”: all the scenes that only existed for a single chapter and weren’t really important to the story.
Instead of counting actual chapters here, I split chapters that occurred in multiple scenes. 13 chapters occurred in 2 different locations, 1 chapter occurred across 3 locations. In 16 “chapters” there was a telephone conversation.

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I categorised the locations into 8 types of location (including “travel” and “others”).
I also recorded events that occurred, grouped into 14 messy, unsatisfying categories:

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AND SO, HERE’S MY FORMULA FOR A GREAT DETECTIVE THRILLER
Show ContentIt's pretty terrible but also I'm amazing never doubt my genius:
This will give you a template for a best-selling detective-thriller novel. You’re welcome, I’ve given you all a fool-proof method to instant wealth and fame.

I'm going to write up a prototype bestseller detective thriller now, and post it here when it's complete. Ready your eyes to weep tears of joy about how great I am and how excellent this whole thing was
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#2
(29-08-2018, 04:43 PM)crispier taco Wrote: I'm going to write up a prototype bestseller detective thriller now, and post it here when it's complete. Ready your eyes to weep tears of joy about how great I am and how excellent this whole thing was

Thanks for the formula, brb gonna write a shitty book and post it here.

Hey I never read Di Vincis code. Still worth it now? I only read Angels and Demons which was so goddam fantastic that I even wrote a paper on it at High School about how terrorist could use antimatter to bomb us all. I think Jargonion then even made a decent mockery of it and posted it up on a wiki site somewhere.
Liams Wrote:make a car out of scrap metal from genie lamps
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#3
(29-08-2018, 08:34 PM)NZs no.3 Wrote: Hey I never read Di Vincis code. Still worth it now? I only read Angels and Demons which was so goddam fantastic that I even ...

Yeah if Dan Brown perfected one thing it was a fast paced story. The Da Vinci Code is basically a single long chase scene punctuated by flashbacks and riddles and a conspiracy theory. The whole story takes place over less than two days.

So yeah a quick, good read.
Warm-up for a lapsed reader before leaping into something that's a bit chewier
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#4
Quality content
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#5
I never figured out if I just got numb to the whole formula (Dan Brown's, whether or not it's the same as this magnificent newborn), or if his writing slowly turned to shit. The Da Vinci Code was up to par, but then he spent ~5 years before defecating the lost symbol, and then he truly ran out of steam. was it me? or is there an inherent weakness to the code? A failsafe of diminishing returns, to protect against a monopoly in the fodder thriller industry?
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#6
(01-09-2018, 11:20 PM)████ Wrote: I never figured out if I just got numb to the whole formula (Dan Brown's, whether or not it's the same as this magnificent newborn), or if his writing slowly turned to shit. The Da Vinci Code was up to par, but then he spent ~5 years before defecating the lost symbol, and then he truly ran out of steam. was it me? or is there an inherent weakness to the code? A failsafe of diminishing returns, to protect against a monopoly in the fodder thriller industry?

I never read The Lost Symbol so can't comment on that, but I do feel like Dan uses boring characters that you can figure out pretty easy. What actually makes his stories interesting is probably the scene. Sort of like how Black Mirror is all about the scary technology and often uses (in the few episodes I have seen) boring stock characters.
He described the female protagonist Sophie Neveu's features as "soft" enough times to gross me out a bit. Who wants a "soft" woman?

I definitely don't think he could top The Da Vinci Code for scandal or conspiracy theory. He covered the Illuminati before it was a meme. By comparison Freemasons are kind of boring and he's late to the party. His other books are about encryption (Digital Fortress) and a life on mars hoax (Deception Point) which were less about secret old-timey conspiracy clubs and more about government-level modern conspiracy stuff.

He'd probably do better with a 9/11 truther-style conspiracy theme for his next book. Get in on some al-qaeda/IS, mercenaries, politicians and buzzwords like "military-industrial complex".



But yeah maybe he's running out of ways to write a fast paced treasure hunt without it seeming quite derivative of his earlier works?
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#7
Let's all go play the original Deus Ex.
[Image: Nsi2Ruz.png]
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#8
(02-09-2018, 01:28 PM)crispier taco Wrote: But yeah maybe he's running out of ways to write a fast paced treasure hunt without it seeming quite derivative of his earlier works?

Have you read Angels and Demons? The only one i can weigh in on. What do you think of that?
Liams Wrote:make a car out of scrap metal from genie lamps
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#9
(03-09-2018, 09:03 AM)NZs no.3 Wrote: Have you read Angels and Demons? The only one i can weigh in on. What do you think of that?
Haven't read it in ages, but skimming a pdf of it, I'm remembering how much CERN and antimatter was important in the story. It was a science verses religion scene and so you got all the fun Illuminati and Vatican stuff and high tech gadgets and whatever.

Langdon (the symbologist) in this book gets paired with Vittoria (the physics scientist raised in a catholic seminary but can also fight), making her a better sidekick in my opinion than Sophie Neveu (police cryptologist who turns out to be spoiler spoiler spoiler).

I think you should try his three other books that aren't The defecatedLost Symbol : Deception Point, Digital Fortress, The Da Vinci Code.
They all have a quick pace, fun topics, highly competent female sidekicks that are sometimes convincingly described as sexy.

You'll be able to find at least 3 copies of The Da Vinci Code in any place they sell second hand books, and probably his other novels too. Definitely check them out they're very very readable.
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#10
I have Digital Fortress, and seen the others regularly enough everywhere. He has a new book out soon?
Liams Wrote:make a car out of scrap metal from genie lamps
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