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On Fargo
#1
The Fargo film and series is an excellent exploration of mediocrity, and the way it manifests in the world.

The film, the first entry into the world, has three characters who each explore a different aspect of mediocrity.

Jerry Lundergaard

The reason for Jerry's misconduct in this film is ambiguous, but his ambition is clear: Illegally obtain a grand sum of money. I think the implication is that he's trying to pay off a loan he fraudulently took out- I'm not sure, and it doesn't matter. Jerry plans to get this money by hiring a couple of thugs to kidnap his wife, who will then ransom her back to his wealthy father-in-law. Jerry decides to be the liaison between the thugs and his FiL, telling the FiL that the thugs want significantly more money than he promised them, with the ideal outcome being that he can take the difference with nobody knowing.

Jerry is mediocre. Although he has a title at the car dealership at which he works, he seems to be a poor salesman (resorting to cheap tactics to boost his commission). He is also defrauding the lot by claiming on cars that he doesn't have- a scam so mediocre we watch it fall apart as the real plot goes on. Jerry is a mediocre businessman- he pitches a business idea to his FiL, and has it stolen off of him immediately with only a middling finder's fee offered. Jerry is a mediocre husband- he has his wife kidnapped. Jerry is a mediocre criminal- none of his schemes work out. Jerry's not a schmuck, he's just generally poor at whatever he attempts.

We can only assume that Jerry is scheming for money to escape the mediocre life he has built for himself, but his own mediocrity prevents him from doing so.

Carl Showalter

Carl is the criminal that Jerry hires to kidnap his wife.

Carl is not necessarily poor at what he does- he is actually the most successful person in the film (especially if you consider being woodchippered success). Carl, however, is surrounded by mediocrity, and he knows it. Carl brings along associate Gaear Grimsrud, and the two have a good romp kidnapping Jerry's wife. Everything Carl does stands out as a man who's trying to act as though he's above his surroundings. At one point, Carl hires a prostitute and goes out to dinner and a show. Carl tries to have a civilised discussion, and is visibly annoyed by the mediocrity of his company. Carl reads like a capable criminal who has great potential, but just isn't where he wants to be in life. Most of Carl's scenes have him juxtapose with Gaear, who is virtually mute and entirely thuggish. 

Carl represents those who recognise the mediocrity around them and try to rise above it, but are ultimately unable to escape their surroundings.

Marge Gunderson

Marge is a mediocre cop. Her husband is a mediocre man. Marge is the mediocre everyman.

Marge misses every opportunity to properly connect Jerry to his conspiracy. In fact, it's not until she finds out that an old acquaintance lied to her in an earlier scene that she, a cop, realises that people are capable of telling mistruths. Imagine that- a cop who doesn't suspect the prime suspect could lie to her. Eventually, after fumbling her way through the film, Marge does her job, and the film ends with her expressing her disbelief that someone would commit crimes over money.

Marge represents those who are mediocre, and are comfortable in their mediocrity.

Also, shout out to Jerry's FiL, Wade, who is presented as extremely successful, but gets in over his head and is killed. Not really relevant, but better than giving a shout out to that funny Asian guy.
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#2
I have not seen the movie yet. I will watch it this weekend so I can comment on your post above.

This can be a Fargo thread in general?

Love the first 2 seasons. Really enjoyed how the second season tied in with the first. I was sure Lou Solverson was going to get shot by the Native American Hanzee. But nah, just turns out he got that wound later on in life that retired him. And the UFO? I mean, what a stand out moment. Was pretty cool. I can't really pick why it was there. I've read some things about Fargo celebrating mediocrity (as you say above) and it using the "true story" tagline to explore new ways to tell a story. It was based in the 70s which was the height of UFO sightings and interest, and there were other references during the season.

Also Mike Milligan being sentenced to a boring corporate desk job was halirous. What a great ending.
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#3
This is a Fargo thread
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#4
Mike Milligan was also the worst character in any form of Fargo. the character was fine, the actor was just so shit.
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#5
I also like that you think taking magic mushrooms and listen to me rambling on and on counts as reading.
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#6
Counts as reading what?
Liams Wrote:make a car out of scrap metal from genie lamps
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#7
(27-06-2019, 03:08 PM)NZs no.3 Wrote: Counts as reading what?

(27-06-2019, 02:32 PM)NZs no.3 Wrote: I've read some things about Fargo celebrating mediocrity (as you say above)

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#8
Yeah:

(27-06-2019, 04:47 PM)Jargonion Wrote: The Fargo film and series is an excellent exploration of mediocrity, and the way it manifests in the world.

The film, the first entry into the world, has three characters who each explore a different aspect of mediocrity.

As he wrote above. Which is what I meant. And other things I've read too.
Liams Wrote:make a car out of scrap metal from genie lamps
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#9
yeah but why were you on mushrooms the whole time
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#10
But you were on mushrooms the whole time
Liams Wrote:make a car out of scrap metal from genie lamps
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